For today’s post we let the Ugandan president speak for those of us that advocate for the reduction of energy poverty being the number one priority for humanity, and something that cannot be adequately addressed while climate alarmism and net zero fantasies drive governments to reduce the total supply of global energy to try to engineer some random future climate state, against all odds and logic.

ARTICLE / SOURCE:

Solar and Wind Force Poverty on Africa – Wall Street Journal

KEY QUOTES:

…many developed nations are pushing an accelerated transition to renewables on Africa. The Western aid-industrial complex, composed of nongovernmental organizations and state development agencies, has poured money into wind and solar projects across the continent. This earns them praise in the U.S. and Europe but leaves many Africans with unreliable and expensive electricity that depends on diesel generators or batteries on overcast or still days. Generators and the mining of lithium for batteries are both highly polluting.

Saying any of this meets with backlash from developed nations. Instead of reliable renewables or greener fossil fuels, aid money and development investments go to pushing solar and wind, with all their accompanying drawbacks. And many Western nations have put a blanket ban on public funding for a range of fossil-fuel projects abroad, making it difficult for Africa to make the transition to cleaner nonrenewables.

In the coming decades my continent will have a strong influence on global warming. But it doesn’t now. Were sub-Saharan Africa (minus South Africa) to triple its electricity consumption overnight, powering the new usage entirely by gas, it would add only 0.6% to global carbon emissions.